Why do you read this blog?

Why do you read this blog?

by Jon Rappoport

March 9, 2017

I’m making a few assumptions.

You have your own idea about what “the reality machine” is. It may not be a perfectly formed idea, but it’s there, and you know there’s something very important and interesting about what sits outside that machine. You know the machine has something to do with imposed limitations on the mind. You think about offloading those limitations.

You consider the possibility that imagination is relevant to what sits outside the reality machine. Imagination isn’t preoccupied with what already exists in the world or in the mind. That’s a clue. Imagination journeys into untapped realms. You wonder about just how powerful imagination can be.

In the course of your life, you’ve had moments when limitations went away. How and why that happened may not be clear, but the experiences were vivid, and you can still remember some of them. The clouds parted. The gates opened.

And what I keep saying, in one way or another, is: imagination is the key. It’s the key to offloading limitations.

That’s because imagination doesn’t care about repeating, over and over, what is already known and understood and perceived. That repetition doesn’t disclose what sits outside the machine.

To exit the environs of the machine, you need to deploy the faculty you’ve always had, the faculty that never goes away, the faculty that leads you into unexplored territory. It’s not enough to “try to change what you perceive,” in order to see beyond the machine. You need to invent.

Imagine.

When I put together my collection, Exit From The Matrix, invention was my target. All the imagination exercises in that collection were designed to bring this faculty front and center.

The machine says: “Here is what reality is, and there is what reality is, and over there is more of what reality is, and what I show you is all that reality is. There is no other reality.”

The faculty of imagination says: “There is no limit to what reality is, because you can invent new realities at every conceivable level of life and perception and experience.”

Obviously, what I’m talking about here is not found in any text book. It isn’t widely disseminated knowledge. This isn’t psychology in any traditional sense of the word. It’s not part and parcel of what society is.

I learned a great deal from reflecting on my experiences as a painter. I realized I could file that knowledge away or base my life on it. I could make it “dead data” or the wellspring of my own future.

What I’m discussing here, in this article, is not a principle implicit in the universe. People might like to say it is because then it takes the focus away from them. What I’m discussing in this article is implicit in the individual.

“The machine” is a metaphor for engineered consent on every level of life and consciousness, and at bottom the prime engineer is the individual himself. What is being engineered? Limitation. Lack of imagination. Normalcy.

“All human accomplishment has the same origin, identically… Imagination, imagination, imagination. It converts to actual. It sustains, it alters, it redeems!” (Saul Bellow)

“I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.” (Albert Einstein)

“This world is but canvas to our imaginations.” (Henry David Thoreau)

“Imagination is like a muscle. I found out that the more I wrote, the bigger it got.” (Philip Jose Farmer)

“Imagination is the only weapon in the war against reality.” (Lewis Carroll)

“The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way. Some see nature all ridicule and deformity… and some scarce see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.” (William Blake)

“We lay there and looked up at the night sky and she told me about stars called blue squares and red swirls and I told her I’d never heard of them. Of course not, she said, the really important stuff they never tell you. You have to imagine it on your own.” (Brian Andreas)

“The world of reality has its limits; the world of imagination is boundless.” (Jean-Jacques Rousseau)

“Imagination isn’t a thing. It isn’t an object you can look at and measure. It’s more like a secret language you’ve always known how to speak. But then they taught you the standard language. Nothing wrong with that, except you forgot the first language. You took the magic language and put it on a remote shelf in a faraway room. And now you look for it as if it were a chunk of gold. But that secret language has no boundaries. You can make it bigger. You can expand it without end. You can try to describe this language and characterize it and even define it, but then that limits what you’ll do with it. All the trouble starts with the limiting. You settle for a smaller version of the secret language. You play with the smaller version. After a while, you’ve drained and explored it. What then? You need to expand and extend the secret language. Keep going. When you do, you find that this world, the physical world, makes more sense. You can see it more clearly. You can deal with it more successfully. That’s good, because you and I and everyone else operates in this world. But that’s not a reason for dropping the secret language…” (The Magician Awakes, Jon Rappoport)


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Advertisements

13 comments on “Why do you read this blog?

  1. Paula Cas says:

    I’ve read your writings for years when I stumbled over your blog. Your posts and other authors like you remind me not to be hypnotized by popular media, and to use my critical thinking skills. Thank you for continuing to help me kick over the traces.

  2. Ram raider says:

    Imagination is things you have not thought of yet.

  3. Greg C. says:

    You know that your imagination is working when you wake up at 3 am with a startling new idea, and can’t get back to sleep because it is so fascinating. At 3 am, the rest of the world is asleep – all the gatekeepers of ideas, the people who expect you to say certain things – all of that is dormant. Your imagination knows this, and chooses the best time to do its thing. Many creative people wake up each day at least 2 hours before everyone else.

  4. choodly says:

    Imagining is also breaking down self built walls and create space to imagine new things you desire and with this expand your sensory awareness. Because of this you discover new things you have never dared to imagine before.

  5. Sam says:

    Imagination needs knowledge and logic to be able to manifest what the imagination has created. Wisdom comes from combining knowledge and logic with creativity and imagination into one energy. This is also known as the energy of a soul/spirit. “The human quality.”

  6. From Quebec says:

    This might sound a little bit crazy, but I create incredible new realities in my dreams when I’m
    sleeping.

    Fortunately. I remember all of my dreams when I wake up. Sometimes I even decide to go back to sleep, just so I can finish my dream. . My imagination is working 100% when I am dreaming.

    Dreaming is a real blessing , you can go everywhere and do anything and everything. I just wish that I could do the same kind of things when I’m awake.

    In other words, my night life is much more exciting than my day life.

    Am I crazy, or is there anybody here that feels the same thing?

    • Paula Cas says:

      Lucid dreaming is a great way to accomplish many things.

    • Sam says:

      If this is crazy then I am right there with ya. Do this all the time also. A lot of sleepless nights and that’s ok with me.

    • Greg C. says:

      What makes dreaming exciting is that each night you get to start from scratch. I mean, you can’t build on a single dream night after night. The dawn is like the tide coming in to wash away the sand castle you built on the beach. It’s no coincidence that we feel most alive in real life when beginning something new to replace something old. We need adventure more than we need comfort, and usually you can’t have both together, but dreams do give us physical comfort with mental adventure.

      • From Quebec says:

        To Paula, Sam and Greg:

        Thanks for the feedback, it feels good to know I’m not the only crazy one here…lol

        What I like about dreaming is that you can do things that you can no more do in real life.
        when you get to a certain age, I’m 72 years ,

        For instance, in my dreams I can ski on the highest and scariest ski slope in the world, and enjoy it fully, with no fear whatsoever, but just pure fulfillment
        I can roller skate around the world easily and never get tire..

        Or I can do things I have never done before, like jumping from a plane with a parachute and many other things. It’s very exciting.

        I also travel a lot in my dreams, to places I’ve never been and seen before, places that probably don’t exist on this planet. And I meet people I’ve never seen before, etc. It is such a perfect beautiful and exiciting world.

        One night I started flying towards the moon, I wanted to see what it really looked like, but I woke up before getting there, and since, I’ve never been able to go back to that dream. I hope one day I will be able to reach the moon and stars in my dreams…lol

      • Greg C. says:

        Quebec: Translating dreams into daily life is the challenge. Though we can’t levitate or fly on our own, we can break free of the limits of matrix reality by doing something good that we tell ourselves we shouldn’t be able to do. I’m not 72, but I’ll be there fairly soon, and part of the matrix reality is that the older you get, the less you are able to do – not just physically, but in any sense. That’s what the whole retirement system feeds – a softer version of Logan’s Run.

        In the play Cyrano de Bergerac, the title character conveys the excitement of flying to the moon through poetry. All the arts are our “outer space.” Music, literature, painting, dance and movement, etc. Through them, we can tap into the magic of desire and intent that it takes to accomplish anything in those fields. All artists start out by imagining that they have something in them that is worth expressing, even if they don’t know exactly what it is. My advice for anyone who says they don’t know where to start, is to say, “Anywhere, just start.” The prodigy is the one who as no self-concern about failure or wasting time. And it can happen at any age, not just childhood.

  7. Joy says:

    Jon, after working with your three collections for several months, this week the Matrix is cracking before my very eyes of seeing and knowing, and “reality” is admitting all sorts of imaginative magic everywhere I turn! There is such a gleeful brightness and quickness to it, a rich fullness of many dimensions, even as Matrix-created “reality” appears to be embroiled in darkness to the usual way of perceiving things. I look at sleeping humanity all around me and have to keep from laughing out loud for it all! Thank you, dearest friend!

  8. sean says:

    That was great.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s