Interviewing the dead Albert Einstein about free will

Interviewing the dead Albert Einstein about free will

 

by Jon Rappoport

 

It was a strange journey into the astral realm to find Albert Einstein.

 

I slipped through gated communities heavily guarded by troops protecting dead Presidents.  I skirted alleys where wannabe demons claiming they were Satan’s reps were selling potions made from powdered skulls of English kings.  I ran through mannequin mansions where trainings for future shoppers were in progress.  Apparently, some souls come to Earth to be born as aggressive entitled consumers.  Who knew?

 

Finally, in a little valley, I spotted a cabin, and there on the porch, sitting in a rocker, smoking a pipe and reading The Bourne Ultimatum, was Dr. Einstein.

 

He was wearing an old sports jacket with leather patches on the elbows, jeans, and furry slippers.

 

I wanted to talk with the great man because I’d read a 1929 Saturday Evening Post interview with him.  He’d said:

 

“I am a determinist. As such, I do not believe in free will…Practically, I am, nevertheless, compelled to act as if freedom of the will existed. If I wish to live in a civilized community, I must act as if man is a responsible being.”

 

Dr, Einstein went inside and brought out two bottles of cold beer and we began our conversation:

 

Q:  Sir, would you say that the underlying nature of physical reality is atomic?

 

A:  If you’re asking me whether atoms and smaller particles exist everywhere in the universe, then of course, yes.

 

Q:  And are you satisfied that, wherever they are found, they are the same? They exhibit a uniformity?

 

A:  Surely, yes.

 

Q:  Regardless of location.

 

A:  Correct.

 

Q:  So, for example, if we consider the make-up of the brain, those atoms are no different in kind from atoms wherever in the universe they are found.

 

A:  That’s true.  The brain is composed entirely of these tiny particles. And the particles, everywhere in the universe, without exception, flow and interact and collide without any exertion of free will. It’s an unending stream of cause and effect.

 

Q:  And when you think to yourself, “I’ll get breakfast now,” what is that?

 

A:  The thought?

 

Q:  Yes.

 

A:  Ultimately, it is the outcome of particles in motion.

 

Q:  You were compelled to have that thought.

 

A:  As odd as that may seem, yes. Of course, we tell ourselves stories to present ourselves with a different version of reality, but those stories are social or cultural constructs.

 

Q:  And those “stories” we tell ourselves—they aren’t freely chosen rationalizations, either. We have no choice about that.

 

A:  Well, yes. That’s right.

 

Q:  So there is nothing in the human brain that allows us the possibility of free will.

 

A:  Nothing at all.

 

Q:  And as we are sitting here right now, sir, looking at each other, sitting and talking, this whole conversation is spooling out in the way that it must. Every word. Neither you nor I is really choosing what we say.

 

A:  I may not like it, but yes, it’s deterministic destiny. The particles flow.

 

Q:  When you pause to consider a question I ask you…even that act of considering is mandated by the motion of atomic and sub-atomic particles. What appears to be you deciding how to give me an answer…that is a delusion.

 

A:  The act of considering?  Why, yes, that, too, would have to be determined.  It’s not free.  There really is no choice involved.

 

Q:  And the outcome of this conversation, whatever points we may or may not agree upon, and the issues we may settle here, about this subject of free will versus determinism…they don’t matter at all, because, when you boil it down, the entire conversation was determined by our thoughts, which are nothing more than atomic and sub-atomic particles in motion—and that motion flows according to laws, none of which have anything to do with human choice.

 

A:  The entire flow of reality, so to speak, proceeds according to determined sets of laws.  Yes.

 

Q:  And we are in that flow.

 

A:  Most certainly we are.

 

Q:  The earnestness with which we might try to settle this issue, our feelings, our thoughts, our striving—that is irrelevant. It’s window dressing. This conversation actually cannot go in different possible directions. It can only go in one direction.

 

A: That would ultimately have to be so.

 

Q:  Now, are atoms and their components, and any other tiny particles in the universe…are any of them conscious?

 

A:  Of course not.  The particles themselves are not conscious.

 

Q:  Some scientists speculate they are.

 

A:  Some people speculate that the moon can be sliced and served on a plate with fruit.

 

Q:  What do you think “conscious” means?

 

A:  It means we participate in life. We take action. We converse. We gain knowledge.

 

Q:  Any of the so-called faculties we possess—are they ultimately anything more than particles in motion?

 

 

A:  Well, no, they aren’t. Because everything is particles in motion. What else could be happening in this universe?  Nothing.

 

Q:  All right. I’d like to consider the word “understanding.”

 

A:  It’s a given. It’s real.

 

Q:  How so?

 

A: The proof that it’s real, if you will, is that we are having this conversation.  It makes sense to us.

 

Q:  Yes, but how can there be understanding if everything is particles in motion? Do the particles possess understanding?

 

A: No they don’t.

 

Q:  To change the focus just a bit, how can what you and I are saying have any meaning?

 

A:  Words mean things.

 

Q:  Again, I have to point out that, in a universe with no free will, we only have particles in motion. That’s all. That’s all we are. So where does “meaning” come from?

 

A:  “We understand language” is a true proposition.

 

Q:  You’re sure.

 

A:  Of course.

 

Q:  Then I suggest you’ve tangled yourself in a contradiction. In the universe you depict, there would be no room for understanding.  Or meaning.   There would be nowhere for it to come from.  Unless particles understand.  Do they?

 

A:  No.

 

Q:  Then where do “understanding” and “meaning” come from?

 

A:  [Silence.]

 

Q:  Furthermore, sir, if we accept your depiction of a universe of particles, then there is no basis for this conversation at all. We don’t understand each other. How could we?

 

A:  But we do understand each other.

 

Q:  And therefore, your philosophic materialism (no free will, only particles in motion) must have a flaw.

 

A:  What flaw?

 

Q:  Our existence contains more than particles in motion.

 

A:  More?  What would that be?

 

Q:  Would you grant that whatever it is, it is non-material?

 

A:  It would have to be, but…

 

Q:  Then, driving further along this line, there is something non-material which is present, which allows us to understand each other, which allows us to comprehend meaning. We are conscious. Puppets are not conscious.  As we sit here talking, I understand you. Do you understand me?

 

A:  Of course.

 

Q:  Then that understanding is coming from something other than particles in motion. Without this non-material quality, you and I would be gibbering in the dark.

 

A:  You’re saying that, if all the particles in the universe, including those that make up the brain, possess no consciousness, no understanding, no comprehension of meaning, no freedom, then how can they give birth to understanding and freedom. There must be another factor, and it would have to be non-material.

 

Q:  Yes. That’s what I’m saying.  And I think you have to admit your view of determinism and particles in motion—that picture of the universe—leads to several absurdities.

 

A:  Well…perhaps I’m forced to consider it. Otherwise, we can’t sit here and understand each other.

 

Q:  You and I do understand each other.

 

A:  I hadn’t thought it through this way before, but if there is nothing inherent in particles that gives rise to understanding and meaning, then everything is gibberish. Except it isn’t gibberish. Yes, I seem to see a contradiction.  Interesting.

 

Q:  And if these non-material factors—understanding and meaning—exist, then other non-material factors can exist.

 

A:  For example, freedom. I suppose so.

 

Q:  And the drive to eliminate freedom in the world…is more than just the attempt to substitute one automatic reflex for another.

 

A:  That would be…yes, that would be so.

 

Q:  Scientists would be absolutely furious about the idea that, despite all their maneuvering, the most essential aspects of human life are beyond the scope of what they, the scientists, are “in charge of.”

 

A:  It would be a naked challenge to the power of science.

 

Einstein puffed on his pipe and looked out over the valley.  He took a sip of his beer.  After a minute, he said, “Let me see if I can summarize this, because it’s really rather startling.  The universe is nothing but particles.  All those particles follow laws of motion.  They aren’t free.  The brain is made up entirely of those same particles.  Therefore, there is nothing in the brain that would give us freedom.  These particles also don’t understand anything, they don’t make sense of anything, they don’t grasp the meaning of anything.  Since the brain, again, is made up of those particles, it has no power to allow us to grasp meaning or understand anything.  But we do understand.  We do grasp meaning.  Therefore, we are talking about qualities we possess which are not made out of energy.  These qualities are entirely non-material.”

 

He nodded.

 

“In that case,” he said, “there is…oddly enough, a completely different sphere or territory.  It’s non-material.  Therefore, it can’t be measured.  Therefore, it has no beginning or end.  If it did, it would be a material continuum and we could measure it.”

 

He pointed to the valley.

 

“That has energy.  But what does it give me?  Does it allow me to be conscious? Does it allow me to be free, to understand meaning? No.”

 

Then he laughed.  He looked at me.

 

“I’m dead,” he said, “aren’t I?  I didn’t realize it until this very moment.”

 

I shook my head.  “No.  I would say you WERE dead until this moment.”

 

He grinned.  “Yes!” he said.  “That’s a good one.  I WAS dead.”

 

He stood up.

 

“Enough of this beer,” he said.  “I have some schnapps inside.  Let me get it.  Let’s drink the good stuff!  After all, I’m apparently Forever.  And so are you.  And so are we all.”

This is the dream and this is the dreamer for five minutes

This is the dream and this is the dreamer for five minutes

A crazy poem…and explaining the poem…

by Jon Rappoport

February 21, 2017

Whenever I need to remind myself of the essentials, I return to these things:

Poems.

Poems that disassemble reality.

Poems that take apart the machine.

Why not?


I’m walking up Broadway past the print houses and the owl houses and the pool room and the steamships and the tide rushing out leaving an octopus stranded looking around to understand this new planet

I’m walking past a glass and steel triangle and a copper dome and a stand of fruit on the sidewalk and a powder blue Cadillac mumbling old church hymns

I’m walking up Broadway past a row of theaters and an old clock on the side of a tan brick colossus

women in high heels with skinny legs

luminous machine-bankers

Parisian men wearing straw hats rowing small boats in the blue-ink canals

I’m lying back in a leather chair in Grand Central Station and an old man is cutting my hair

he puts a hot white towel on my face

I enter St. Pat’s, it’s a huge bookie joint, crowds standing in the aisles, betting on anti-Lucifer

I take a seat at the end of a long pew and fold my hands in prayer to Piero della Francesca, silver painter of Solomon & Sheba

and Henry Miller of the Rosy Crucifixion and Kenneth Patchen in his bed of pain and Gregory Corso roaming the streets of Rotterdam

blessings of wine and bread and skeletons growing new flesh

…walking up Broadway at dusk, melting into the crowds, reading their money minds, worshiping the sun veined with purple roses, a department store dream, marble floors, silent limousines waiting at the curb

I’m walking past four-armed genetic heralds and sad androids and murderous shoe salesmen from the 1950s, velvet furniture, apples too red to be real, false blood, reporters lapping up fumes, idolatrous cellophane ghosts in the park, moon over old Hoboken, broken planks on the dock

savage lulubells bloom in cartoon park and westerly winds, an ice landing full of chimes and lopsided sunrise, heroic mahogany symphony on walls of scribbled gilded breath, ornate redemption of vehicles

I walk past Hantu Raya balloons and prelude war parade glittering confetti, Bowery brown and gray men scattered out on the dismal sidewalk

piers of giant locks and hasps, through tunnels of rotting rain, into the cobblestone wind

last slanted rays on green vines, stolen by the Church from nature, stolen by nature from an unknown poet

the escape into furniture, the soul over and over again

The heralds sang, the disputed heaven tottered and broke through the clouds

Why not?

What is the addiction to reality?

To the machine?

Loosen the cords.

Take a ride on the elevated trolley…

“But I don’t understand that ‘poem’ you wrote…I don’t understand a thing in it…”

“That’s all right…did anything kick off a spark, just one…”

“Well maybe could be…the powder blue Cadillac and the stolen by nature from an unknown poet…”

“Have you ever had a dream where you walked through a landscape that was more real than waking life…”

“Sure, everybody has. I was in a mall that reminded me of some kind of moonscape. It was super-real, and when I woke up I felt…refreshed…like I’d taken a bath in energy…”

“Well, that’s how I felt when I wrote that crazy poem…”

“Really?”

“Really.”

“Why?”

“Why not?”

“But I mean, it doesn’t make any sense…”

“Can’t you take a quick vacation from making ordinary sense?”

“Is that allowed?”

“Who is supposed to allow it?”

“Don’t know…”

“Is there a king who decides what makes sense?”

“Everybody decides all together…”

“You mean they meet in a room and have a conference?”

“Well no…”

“I think secretly you understood the poem…”

“No, no, no…”

“Why not?”

“I’m not supposed to.”

“Who said so?”

“If I understood it, I’d be crazy…”

“You weren’t crazy in that moonscape dream.”

“But that was just a dream.”

“The poem is a kind of dream. You can think of it that way.”

“I can?”

“Absolutely. I give you permission.”

“Who are you?”

“I’m a dispenser of wide-ranging allowances. I’m a vacation expert. I give you a poem that’s a five-minute vacation from the machine…”

“Why?”

“Just for the hell of it.”

“Just like that?”

“Just like that.”

“Who gave you that job?”

“The Pope.”

“Who?”

“I met with the Pope and he said it was okay.”

“You’re messing with me.”

“Okay, it wasn’t the Pope. It was me. I gave myself permission.”

“Just a five-minute vacation?”

“That’s all. And then you can go back to what you were doing.”

“I lay down a book called reality and I pick up another book for five minutes.”

“That’s right.”

“Maybe I could do that.”

“I believe you could.”

“I could sort of act like I was crazy for five minutes.”

“If you want to think of it that way.”

“I could just climb out on a limb and jump off…”

“Sure. If you want to think of it that way.”

“I could pretend I was walking around on the moon for five minutes.”

“Why not?”

“I could pretend I understood the poem.”

“Yes, pretend you did. Pretend you do.”

“Fake it.”

“Exactly. Fake it.”

“Well, why didn’t you say that? I know how to fake it.”

“I’m sure you do.”

“I fake it most of the time. I mean, I sort of fake things so I can understand them. First, I fake it. Then I get into what I’m faking. It’s like acting. It’s like being in a play.”

“Of course. You’re in a play and you’re playing a character who understands the poem. Why not?”

“And then I leave the play and I go back to being me.”

“Sure. It’s up to you.”

“I can invent whatever I want to for five minutes.”

“Nobody would stop you.”

“Well, I can think of a few people who would stop me.”

“Which people?”

“The Washington Post and a psychiatrist.”

“You mean the Washington Post would run a page-one headline with your name in it and it would say: THIS MAN IS CRAZY.”

“It could happen.”

“Really.”

“Yes.”

“You think the Washington Post cares.”

“It’s possible.”

“I’ll bet you a thousand dollars they don’t run the headline.”

“You think I’m nuts? I wouldn’t take that bet.”

“The Washington Post won’t know you understand the poem. Trust me.”

“You’re sure.”

“Positively.”

“Okay. I understand the poem.”

“See? That was easy.”

“I mean I can pretend I understand it.”

“Good. It’s just a five-minute vacation.”

“I can do that.”

“I know you can.”

“I throw the rules out the window.”

“Right.”

“It’s a relief.”

“I know.”

“Why are the reality rules there in the first place?”

“It’s foolish, isn’t it?”

“Suppose I invent a new reality for myself?”

“I wouldn’t stop you.”

“Who would?”

“Nobody…”

“Why are you having this conversation with me?”

“You’re having this conversation with yourself. I’m just egging you on a little…”

“You’re stimulating me.”

“If you want to think of it that way.”

“It’s an interesting poem.”

“I like it.”

“Why?”

“I just do.”

“You promise you won’t tell anybody that I stopped being ordinary me for five minutes?”

“I promise.”

“Because my whole reputation could be ruined.”

“I promise.”

“People would say I went off the rails.”

“No one will know.”

“This conversation never happened.”

“Never.”

“I’m sane. Always was, always will be.”

“You bet.”

“I’m an ordinary person trying to understand something that isn’t ordinary for five minutes. That’s as far as I’m willing to go.”

“Understood.”

“Reality is ordinary all the way down. It couldn’t be otherwise.”

“Absolutely.”

“Okay. Now get out of here. I don’t want anybody watching me while I fake it and pretend something makes sense that makes no sense.”

“I’m gone.”

“Bye.”

“Bye.”


power outside the matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

The myth of collective consciousness

The myth of collective consciousness

by Jon Rappoport

February 20, 2017

“There are millions of people who came out of the 1960s with the idea that ‘self’ was a terrible entity, and only by existing all together, with everyone, in a single state of consciousness, could the world be saved. They bought a new fairy tale to replace an old one. They couldn’t find another answer to materialism.” (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

In past articles, I’ve extensively covered the collective/group myth on several levels. But what about the so-called spiritual level?

What about the influential idea that, in an advanced state, humans would enter an ultimate collective cosmic unity?

Let’s start this way: somehow, you’re given access to the greatest store anywhere in the universe. Your credit card has no limit.

You walk through the gigantic space. You see cars and clothes and shoes and food and cell phones and toys and books and DVDs and CDs and TV sets and private jets and ships and pictures of mansions and islands for sale and pets and more, much more.

You love it.

You spend a long, long time browsing and buying and chatting with the friendly staff, and you know that, yes, this is the store you’ve always to shop in. This is the place.

And finally, when you’ve made all your purchases, and you’re on your way out, you discover that all the doors are locked. You can’t leave.

At that moment, the store isn’t your favorite place anymore.

Something is wrong. Very wrong.

So here’s the comparison; yes, any state of consciousness that can be conceived or imagined or proposed is possible, but adding the kicker that it’s final and nobody exits from it is preposterous.

Individuals can have the experience of merging with each other—that collective experience. The “I” can decide to become “We.” Sure. Why not?

But…

Having done that, you can decide at some point that it’s time to leave. Then, if you couldn’t leave, you’d change your mind about the whole set-up.

Some people would say that once you entered collective cosmic consciousness, you’d never want to leave, but that’s just their opinion.

In other words, every possible state of consciousness is voluntary, effected in freedom. Ditto for exiting it.

Which means there is nothing final about collective consciousness or unity. It isn’t the final attainment. It’s another form of perception.

You can choose a role in the play of consciousness, and you can also retire from the cast and go on to other roles. And wherever you go, whatever you do, you’re you.

Being you isn’t limiting in the slightest, unless you make it so.

If you have been severely hamstringing you, the automatic solution isn’t suddenly “merging with everyone and everything else.” That might be a good and interesting exercise, to pull you out of a doldrum and a state of inertia, but it isn’t The Answer. There are lots of ways you can launch out of inertia.

Someone says, “Let’s all be One.”

You say, “Sounds exciting. I’m in.”

And then you do it.

“Wow,” you say, “this is fantastic. I’m you and you’re me and we’re all together—here comes a bunch more people to join in.”

You stay there in Oneness for a while. You have a great time…and then you say, “See you later, guys, it’s been fun.”

And they say, “Wait, how can you leave? This is IT.”

And you say, “I know. But there are lots of ITS. Bye bye.”

Entrances and exits, entrances and exits.


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

The point at which all news becomes fake news

The point at which all news becomes fake news

by Jon Rappoport

February 15, 2017

This is a companion piece to my previous article, “Occult Man and his search for his true Nature.”

True and vital news about the world as it actually is behind the scenes, will always be true, unless a person uses it to stop his forward progress and stop his graduation up on to another level of consciousness. In that case, true news becomes fake, because the person is absorbing it to keep himself from discovering his basic nature.

The most familiar way this happens: “The world is completely controlled by elite forces. I’ve figured it out. There is nothing I can do about it. I’ll just keep my head down and live out my life…”

Passivity.

Investigation leads to insight leads to passivity.

Or: “I see what’s really happening in the world. Finally. But I can’t talk to the people I know about it. They don’t get it. So I’ll forget the whole thing and just try to get along…”

Investigation leads to insight leads to passivity.

Suppose, though, a person’s true nature is: THE MAKER OF REALITIES.

In that case, his investigation has uncovered the fact that elites are making their realities for all of us…and the individual’s true nature involves flipping the script.

Discovering how elites contrive reality should be a bracing insight. It should inspire new energy. It should give birth to a counter instinct. The creative instinct.

The individual’s “phase-two” journey begins from recognizing his own creative force.

Think of it as: the painter who has never painted wakes up one morning and sees, all around him, a studio: blank canvases, brushes, paints. Now he can start.

The world is open. The future is open.

Now, the real news is still real. It isn’t his reason to become passive. Quite the opposite.


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

Occult Man and his search for his true nature

Occult Man and his search for his true nature

by Jon Rappoport

February 15, 2017

The word “occult” is frequently associated with a secret society, and it is given a negative twist by pitting it against organized “clean” religion or “totally rational” science.

But the Latin root of the word comes from the verb, “to hide.” That’s all.

Occult Man means man who is hiding something. And it really means man who is hiding something from himself. What would that be?

Occult man is hiding his true nature from himself.

In order to discover what that true nature is, he would already need to be free from the belief that he owes his time, energy, and life to another person or an idea. He would need to be free from the self-debasing concept of spiritual debt—regardless of how fashionable it might be to incur (or pretend to incur) such a negative balance sheet.

Legion are those who invent these “debt scenarios” for themselves, and they rarely give them up, regardless of the consequences. They prefer to imagine they “win by losing.”

When Occult Man embarks on the journey to find his true nature, he enters a labyrinth. Sooner or later, he needs to realize the maze is composed of all possible answers to his self-inquiry. How to choose one answer above all others? How to discern?

Nevertheless, despite the difficulties, he will choose. He will clutch an answer, he will adopt it, and he will begin to live on that basis. He will say, “This is my true nature,” he will climb into that conveyance and drive it down the road.

After a certain period, he will see its limitations, he will experience first-hand the pressure of those restrictions, and he will look for a more inclusive answer to his inquiry.

As this process of accepting, testing, and rejecting answers continues, he will become aware that each solution to what-is-my-true-nature gives birth to a space that is defined—and his primary role is to fit himself into that space.

In the majority of cases, Occult Man eventually talks himself into accepting a space and learning how to adapt to his position in it. It is as if, all along, he has been asking himself, “What is my place?”

Relatively few people are prepared to admit this is a loaded question. They would rather adhere to one of thousands of “philosophies” which are determined to tell Occult Man what his place is.

According to this sort of guidance, Occult Man is supposed to take pride in finding that place.

For those who can avoid this end, there remains a less-defined path. “Where do I go? What do I do? What am I looking for?”

What about looking within? As interesting as this option may seem, and as rooted in tradition, what results does it confer?

Either Occult Man looks within and sees, disappointingly, spaces populated by random objects and ideas, or he presupposes what he is going to discover, and then discovers it. Needless to say, such sleight of hand isn’t the means for finding his true nature.

What now?

Now we come to the threshold of a shift into another dimension of experience. Regardless of how long the journey has taken so far, now Occult Man begins to examine his very role as the searcher. The seeker. The discoverer.

Is the whole paradigm of questioner-question-answer able to yield up the effect of finding his true nature?

And in parallel, can he harken back to some past tradition and say, “Well, my conundrum triggers answers put forth by this body of wisdom or that body of wisdom or this enlightened master…” Do these references give him what he wants?

At every turn, it seems as if he’s been looking for some sort of content or material or information that will unlock the door. Or perhaps he needs an experience that will shock his system into a new realm of perception.

All along, he has been searching for some kind of reality that is already there. A deeper reality, a more elevated reality. Concealed, out of view. Hidden.

Which is why he is Occult Man. Because of the way he has been proceeding.

But suppose…there is no such hidden reality which is his true nature. Suppose that is the cosmic joke.

And suppose, instead, he is the maker of realities.

Suppose that is his true nature.

Suppose every system and traditional belief avoids putting the finger on his true nature.

Suppose he has no pre-defined place.

Suppose the shape and character of societies and civilizations on Earth flow from the inability of individuals to see their true nature?

There is much more to say about this subject, but I’ll leave it here for now—except to mention that everything I’ve authored in my collection, Exit From The Matrix, is designed to increase an individual’s power to make realities of his own choosing.


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

My private consulting services and writers

My private consulting services and writers

by Jon Rappoport

February 13, 2017

Over the years, my private clients have worked in many fields, but about half of them have been writers; or have wanted to be writers.

The marvelous thing about writing is that you can start anywhere. In a small room with a pencil and paper. In a field. In a café. In a library.

In a library, you can read and learn from the greatest minds and styles of the human race. You can sit and read. You can check books out. All without spending a dime.

Writing doesn’t require you convincing others about your choice of work. You do the work. You write every day. You investigate, if that’s what you’re disposed to do. You put words on paper. And now, with Web, you can publish them. There is no limit or boundary on what you can write and publish.

You can invent worlds, or put this one on its feet, because it’s been upside down for a long, long time.

You can take flight. Your imagination finally has an outlet.

You can make past present, and vice versa. You can flesh out futures. You can speak your mind.

You can stake your claim as the judge of your own work.

You can write a thousand-page poem, or a play or an essay or an article or a memoir. You can go up, down, or sideways. And in the process, you begin a new life.

You can write about what you know. You can write about what you don’t know. You can write about what has never been. You can write about the bottom of a well or the top of the sky.

You can express feelings. You can invent feelings. You can inhabit characters. You can take yourself light years past where you were.

This is just the beginning—because you can keep going as a writer forever, if you want to…

You’re circumscribed only by your imagination. And as you discover, imagination is prepared to go anywhere at the drop of a hat. It has no fences. It seeks no rules or systems.

And that’s pure magic.

(My collection, Power Outside The Matrix, has an extensive Writer’s Tutorial.)


power outside the matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Notes on Exit From The Matrix

Notes on Exit From The Matrix

by Jon Rappoport

February 13, 2017

These are notes I made in preparation for my collection Exit From The Matrix:

“New space and time appear when a person contemplates doing something he really wants to do.”

“The greatest thing in the world is doing what you really want to do. Once you start, all sorts of implications and ripples and consequences develop. You even begin to imagine new branches on that tree. The tree gets bigger. There are no limits.”

“The self plus imagination plus commitment to action is a force that, in the long run, can never be defeated.”

“What is a goal? It’s really doing more and more of what you want to do. How you organize it and define it are secondary.”

“Everybody knows that time changes when you’re absorbed in doing what you really want to do. But how many people realize that’s a revision of time itself? Time is a function of doing what you want to do.”

“Finding a new goal, a new direction isn’t all that hard. Committing to it and acting on it is a different matter. If you want to achieve the goal, think of the alternative: doing nothing. Acting on a new goal has nothing to do with perfection. Perfection as a prerequisite is a waste of time. It’s also likely to be just one more way of postponing action.”

“Goals don’t have to be described with exact clarity at the outset. As you take action, things will become clearer, things will develop. For example, if your goal is to write, then write. Later on, you can decide what kind of writing you want to do. You may discover you want to do five different kinds of writing.”

“When a person has a problem, the question is, in what context does the problem exist? If there is no context, then the person has lost sight of what he wants to do in life.”

“Knowing what you want to do, and doing it, creates a perspective from which problems are manageable.”

“I’ve known people who have swung into action on a goal…and then later, in the midst of their action, they discovered a larger purpose. If they weren’t taking action, they never would have discovered the new purpose.”

“What holds a person back? He perceives he has a problem. But he has no larger context in which he can view the problem.”

“Does a person want to get ahead and advance along a certain line or doesn’t he? If not, he’s in a muddle. The muddle looks like a problem. He produces excuses. The answer is always reaching out into the world with action. His imagination is telling him that all the time, but he isn’t listening.”

“Why do people give up? Because they want to.”

“Why do people strive to create something they desire in the world? Because they want to.”

“Why do people occupy a middle ground between these two choices? Because they want to.”

“Fortunately, a person can change his mind about what he wants. And then, in a second, everything changes. Imagination is the key. He imagines something new and he says, ‘That’s it. That’s what I want’.”


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.