Psychology as mystical symbolism

Psychology as mystical symbolism

by Jon Rappoport

March 1, 2017

Every time I re-publish this piece, I find another angle to emphasize.

This time, it’s reductionism, the strategy of making the truth, whatever it is, into something overly simple and, therefore, deceptive and false.

Approaching the subject of human suffering and anguish, from an honest viewpoint, gives you all sorts of experience to explore: people are abused, they are minimized, they have severe nutritional deficits, they live in poverty, they are surrounded by the threat of violence, they receive poor and confusing educations, they are exposed to toxic chemicals and drugs, they develop weak immune systems, they don’t know how to cope with peer pressure to conform, they never learn what freedom means, and so forth and so on.

And then…all this is reformulated and boiled down to a series of so-called mental disorders with names and labels. Symbols. Reductionism.

Such symbols can snare many people and drag them into slave-camps of the mind.

If you want people to become far more ignorant than they already are, you need look no further than the field of psychiatry, which is rife with symbols, which are the names of so-called mental disorders. There are about 300 in the official psychiatric bible. They appear to designate actual mental states, but upon close inspection, they’re empty of scientific meaning.

Pretending to represent erudite research, they impart gibberish.

An acceptance of these mental-disorder symbols automatically short-circuits any investigation of the mind’s true potential or power.

False map, no authentic territory, no treasure.

As a psychiatrist who left his profession in disgust once wrote me, “I was playing a shell game with my patients. I could label a person with one disorder, prescribe a drug, eventually diagnose a new disorder, combine drugs, adjust the dosages, and go on this way for many appointments. But all the labels were shams…”

They’re symbols. They appear to stand for something solid, but they don’t.

As I’ve shown in several articles, all so-called mental disorders are based on no definitive diagnostic tests. No saliva, no blood, no genes, no brain scans, for any of the 300 labels.

So what we have in psychiatry is a secular organized religion, a Tower of Babble outfitted with thousands of entirely fictional symbols. Which the priests know how to use. They have that training.

People in the general population are asking for shorthand explanations, and the professional symbol-talkers fulfill that need. That’s the exchange. That’s the transaction. The psychiatrist announces a symbol, which is the label for a disorder, the patient asks what it means, and the doctor explains.

Without the symbol, however, nothing happens. Nothing is consummated.

Give a human a symbol and he’s all ears. He wants to know. He must know. A symbol functions like a scent to a dog. He has to track it down.

If psychiatrists could make it work, they’d wear purple robes embroidered with esoteric shapes and signs and a tall hat topped by a star. They’d gaze into a pond and stir the water with a stick and produce Insight. They’d channel an entity from Ursa Minor in a dark room with organ music.

Freud’s nephew, Edward Bernays, the father of modern public relations, used his skills to promote his uncle’s work. Surely, Bernays saw, in Freud, a brilliant salesman, who had invented a whole new library of symbols that could be dumped on the masses, and then translated for public consumption.

A new church of the mind would be born.

The whole thrust of psychology/psychiatry, during its history, has been “resolution of the negative.”

I fully realize that psychology covers a wide territory, and there are exceptions to the rule. But all in all, the modern field of therapy is focused on “solving issues.”

Remedying problems whose roots are thought to be in the past.

Psychological “research” is fashioned to resemble the conventional practice of medicine, in which “negative elements are removed.”

Psychology’s public relations fronts and political connections have enabled it to gain an astonishing position in society. And this helps make people believe its central premise is true.

But is it? People, particularly patients, are malleable. Tell them that negative factors, traumas or conflicts out of the past are the reason they’re unhappy in the present, and they may well sign on the dotted line.

“Well, that makes sense. For instance, my father and I…and then there was my grandmother…she lived with us for a while…she was a martinet…always hounding me…”

Psychology maintains that “resolving” these past relationships will bring a greater sense of peace and normalcy to life.

But suppose there is a much larger unexplored territory in consciousness where the concerns are quite different, and far more profound?

I’m talking about everything that involves living a truly creative life. Imagination, invention, vision, and vast untapped energy.

Most of what’s called psychology doesn’t tread in these deep waters.

And that is evidence of massive ignorance.

It is futile to try to convince a conventional psychologist that the creative life should be his central focus.

If it were, it wouldn’t be psychology.

The creative life exceeds the norms of society. A life lived through and by imagination breaks through the ceiling of the universal fixation on problems.

James Hillman, psychologist and director of studies at the Jung Institute in Zurich, co-authored the book, “We’ve Had a Hundred Years of Therapy & the World’s Getting Worse.” Here are two Hillman quotes about psychology:

“Where a case history presents a sequence of facts leading to diagnosis, soul history shows rather a concentric helter-skelter pointing always beyond itself … We cannot get a soul history through a case history.”

“Our lives are determined less by our childhood than by the traumatic way we have learned to remember our childhoods.”

People learn how to “think about life” through the lens of psychology.

As a result, a putrid kind of brain-addled pop pseudoscience floats like a foam over the crest of society.

And when, in its own defense, advocates claim psychology is a science, they may as well be saying that an anthropologist, sitting in the jungle making notes on ants, is discovering vital facts about humans. The ants, if they knew what was happening, would, I’m sure, treat the whole enterprise as a fantastic joke. Just as we should, when shiny new psychology PhDs emerge from universities to treat the mind.

If all of psychology, its fatuous notions, and our memory of them disappeared from the earth tomorrow, much of society would come face to face with an interesting void. And then real exploration would begin. Again.

And people would eventually gravitate to the Creative Force, which has always existed within themselves.

Without the need for priests spouting mystical symbols.

Here is a passage from my work-in-progress, The Magician Awakes:

“The false magician gives the appearance of constructing a network of interconnected symbols. He need not actually build it. He simply imparts the impression that is already built. On this basis, he draws people in, because they are fascinated by systems, particularly when only certain ‘masters’ understand them. The supplicant wants insight. Reaching for it, he becomes engaged in a labyrinth. He walks many paths, looking for self-wisdom, but it eludes him. Finally, after months, or years, or millennia, he realizes he has been grasping at symbols of a strange map, a map that describes a fictional version of himself. Then he wakes up to the real beginning of his journey.”


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Looking at the Reality Machine

Looking at the Reality Machine

by Jon Rappoport

February 26, 2017

On the plains of Hercules, under the watchtower of a State agency, beside an abandoned factory, in a future where every identity was captured on records and stored in underground cities, one man walked, staggered, and fell.

He knew he was going to die, and his only remaining task was deciding what to think as he passed out of the world. He considered it might be important, as if that thought would linger on the air and float to some unknown place where other souls could pick it up in a net of consciousness and keep it safe.

He lay on hard-packed ground and felt his senses dimming out. He struggled to stay awake. He searched for his final thought and then, miraculously, it came to him:

THERE IS SOMETHING LEFT TO IMAGINE.

As he died, he knew it was a good thought…the world of famine and thirst could be exceeded, and a new period of creation could ensue.

THERE IS SOMETHING LEFT TO IMAGINE.

He died.

In the same way, people die every day in a teeming world of seven billion, thinking a different thought: THERE IS NOTHING LEFT TO IMAGINE. They’re summing up their existence. They’re surrendering. They’re reaching the logical conclusion of years of adaptation. Their last thought fully defines adaptation.

But one contrary spark—there IS something to imagine—restarts the force of a non-system that has no name, can’t have a name because it is outside and beyond every cause-and-effect sequence in the universe.

The reality machine would want to disguise itself. It would want to protect its identity. After all, it is posing as something else. It’s posing as Life.

On the other hand, imagination accepts the existence of the Machine. Imagination understands that certain people want One Reality and don’t want imagination.

Final reality, ultimate reality—imagination understands these are variations on the theme of One Reality. The Big Lie.

The most convincing One is spiritual, of course. The great destination and fulfillment. The last stop on the train. Here we are. Get off now. You’re where you’ve always wanted to be. Good luck.

Yes, the Reality Machine saves the best for last. “If you connect to the Machine, you’ll wind up in clover. The Machine will take you there.”

The Machine projects a soap opera with a happy ending.

Who wouldn’t want that? All you have to do is sacrifice your ability to recognize that a soap opera is a cartoon. What a small price to pay for happiness.

Some people refuse to understand that a cartoon can include pain, suffering, and defeat. Therefore, they don’t see what the Machine is projecting. They don’t see the cartoon.

Quantum entanglement is a significant feature of the cartoon. The capacity of one atom to mirror the reaction of another atom at a great distance isn’t a miracle. It’s a design feature. It’s a kind of glue that holds things together.

Why shouldn’t an atom named Bob, floating somewhere near the center of the Milky Way, remain neutral and disinterested, when an atom named Phil wiggles in Cincinnati? What’s the problem? Why should Bob feel compelled to mimic Phil?

The Reality Machine employs messages (propaganda) urging people to entangle with one another. This isn’t a marvel. It’s an effort to build and maintain a labyrinth. No exit.

Imagination is all exits all the time.

All social systems are built on mimicking and meddling—prime building blocks of a soap opera.

Feeling authentic sympathy for another, outside the cartoon, has nothing to do with mimicking and meddling.

The Machine has no interest in you thinking about these things.

The Machine doesn’t believe you want to exit from the Reality it produces.

Here is a quote from the late great hypnotherapist, Jack True, a man I researched with for several years:

“The mind contains more than average material. It contains other realities, if people would look and see. The mind contains different foundations for alternate realities. These foundations are blocked off. Therefore, a person believes he’s living in the one and only reality. The trick is learning to travel to and from various realities while maintaining your stability…”

Artists are always ahead of the pack. They’re INVENTING new realities that never existed. They’re offering different worlds.

Read that statement again. If a consensus existed about THAT statement, we would soon have a different civilization. We would have new ways of communicating. We would have a different understanding of the so-called ‘human condition’.

The machine says no to all of this. Part of the machine is a declaration of dependence on the machine.

Imagination is a declaration of independence from the machine.

…Imagine that the sprawling platform where universe designers worked was outside the space with which we are familiar. To put a finer point on it, this space with which we are now familiar had not yet been invented; it was on the drawing board.

All the details of the new universe had been covered in the plan. It was there, ready to be launched.

That’s when the stranger walked into the core lab. Somehow, he had eluded the security systems.

He said, “I have it all in my mind.”

No one replied.

“I have the whole plan in my mind,” he said. “It’s easier this way.”

And it was.

One of the scientists looked outside the port and saw the universe unfolding. The space, the clouds of matter, the galaxies, the stars, the planets.

It always happened that way. It was never the same stranger, but whenever a plan for a universe was done, someone would show up and push it into existence.

The scientists would try to question the stranger, but to no effect. He would say nothing more. He would watch the universe grow, and then satisfied, he would disappear.

They, the scientists and engineers, were the designers. He was the launcher.

This time, though, the stranger made another comment:

“That’s the last one,” he said. “There are enough. Besides, a few of the inhabitants will discover how to leave. They’ll pave the way for others. Your whole enterprise will eventually become obsolete. It only works if people believe they’re in a universe for the duration. Once they’re out, the enterprise loses its sense of fascination. I’m surprised you haven’t figured this out by now. Bells and whistles notwithstanding, you’re on the road to elimination. Figure out something else to do.”

One engineer said, “But we design the people, too.”

“No,” the designer said, “you only think you do.”

“You design

“Their outer physical structure

“The ‘people’ are already there

“They’ve always been somewhere

“they’re non-material

get it?”


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

The moon isn’t waiting

The moon isn’t waiting

by Jon Rappoport

February 24, 2017

I have no quarrel with millions of people who are sleeping in the desert of lost cities with toy dolls and leftover mementos of a life they can no longer remember and a language they can no longer speak—it’s just a fact—and the newspapers aren’t covering it so what difference does it make.

I’m tuned to memories of my own—roads of the sun in the stage play where people are finally dropping their masks and…

Sorry, I got off on the wrong track. I must have been dreaming for a minute. I don’t know what happened. I have a job. I have to get back to it. I’m plugging a delicate little part in the Reality Machine and it’s close work. Every day I get to service my little corner. There is no other kind of job, you know. It’s about the machine, and if you haven’t looked into employment opportunities, you really should. The benefits are terrific. And you feel normal.

That’s the main thing. You feel like you’re on the inside. You’re with everybody else. We know what we’re doing. There are no big questions. It’s all technical. What fits, what doesn’t. Is that the way your life is? Don’t you finally want it to be that way? It’s a relief.

You’re finally in the right place. You’ve found your place.

When that happens, nothing can disturb you. You’re there. People can say all sorts of things to you and it doesn’t matter. You’re unmoved. You’re like rock or steel. Nothing makes a difference.

Do you know that feeling? You’re safe.

But once in a while, when I’m dreaming, I travel. I see cities. Some of them are destroyed. Others are marvelously intact and the people are moving around and it’s stimulating and mysterious. I look for a better word to describe it, but I can’t find it.

Then there is no machine. Or it’s turned off. Things are different.

I have an aunt who is that way all the time. She puzzles me. It isn’t what she’s doing, it’s how she does it. She moves from one thing to another.

Last night, I was lying in bed and I imagined I was walking on the moon. It must have had an atmosphere because I didn’t need a space suit. The moon was alive in an odd way. It reminded me of an animal. It was restless. It was preparing to do something. It had a poem inside it. I sensed that. A very large poem, I would say. I was waiting for it, but it never came out to me.

I felt close to the moon. I had discovered it for myself. It wasn’t at all what I thought it would be. I wanted to speak to it, but I couldn’t find the words.

Are you waiting for something?

I appear to be.

I suggest you do something.

I don’t know what that is, but I imagine you do.

Well, you and I probably know what it is, for each of us.

What are we waiting for?

Anyway, I have to get back to my job.

Things are going well. There is a system that oversees the whole machine and reports when a piece needs to be fixed or replaced. It seems to be infallible. We’ve never had significant breakdown.

Technology arrives at a point where what you have works. And then you develop another technology to assure that what you have keeps working.

It’s quite smooth.

Quite.


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Interviewing the dead Albert Einstein about free will

Interviewing the dead Albert Einstein about free will

by Jon Rappoport

February 22, 2017

It was a strange journey into the astral realm to find Albert Einstein.

I slipped through gated communities heavily guarded by troops protecting dead Presidents. I skirted alleys where wannabe demons claiming they were Satan’s reps were selling potions made from powdered skulls of English kings. I ran through mannequin mansions where trainings for future shoppers were in progress. Apparently, some souls come to Earth to be born as aggressive entitled consumers. Who knew?

Finally, in a little valley, I spotted a cabin, and there on the porch, sitting in a rocker, smoking a pipe and reading The Bourne Ultimatum, was Dr. Einstein.

He was wearing an old sports jacket with leather patches on the elbows, jeans, and furry slippers.

I wanted to talk with the great man because I’d read a 1929 Saturday Evening Post interview with him. He’d said:

“I am a determinist. As such, I do not believe in free will…Practically, I am, nevertheless, compelled to act as if freedom of the will existed. If I wish to live in a civilized community, I must act as if man is a responsible being.”

Dr, Einstein went inside and brought out two bottles of cold beer and we began our conversation:

Q: Sir, would you say that the underlying nature of physical reality is atomic?

A: If you’re asking me whether atoms and smaller particles exist everywhere in the universe, then of course, yes.

Q: And are you satisfied that, wherever they are found, they are the same? They exhibit a uniformity?

A: Surely, yes.

Q: Regardless of location.

A: Correct.

Q: So, for example, if we consider the make-up of the brain, those atoms are no different in kind from atoms wherever in the universe they are found.

A: That’s true. The brain is composed entirely of these tiny particles. And the particles, everywhere in the universe, without exception, flow and interact and collide without any exertion of free will. It’s an unending stream of cause and effect.

Q: And when you think to yourself, “I’ll get breakfast now,” what is that?

A: The thought?

Q: Yes.

A: Ultimately, it is the outcome of particles in motion.

Q: You were compelled to have that thought.

A: As odd as that may seem, yes. Of course, we tell ourselves stories to present ourselves with a different version of reality, but those stories are social or cultural constructs.

Q: And those “stories” we tell ourselves—they aren’t freely chosen rationalizations, either. We have no choice about that.

A: Well, yes. That’s right.

Q: So there is nothing in the human brain that allows us the possibility of free will.

A: Nothing at all.

Q: And as we are sitting here right now, sir, looking at each other, sitting and talking, this whole conversation is spooling out in the way that it must. Every word. Neither you nor I is really choosing what we say.

A: I may not like it, but yes, it’s deterministic destiny. The particles flow.

Q: When you pause to consider a question I ask you…even that act of considering is mandated by the motion of atomic and sub-atomic particles. What appears to be you deciding how to give me an answer…that is a delusion.

A: The act of considering? Why, yes, that, too, would have to be determined. It’s not free. There really is no choice involved.

Q: And the outcome of this conversation, whatever points we may or may not agree upon, and the issues we may settle here, about this subject of free will versus determinism…they don’t matter at all, because, when you boil it down, the entire conversation was determined by our thoughts, which are nothing more than atomic and sub-atomic particles in motion—and that motion flows according to laws, none of which have anything to do with human choice.

A: The entire flow of reality, so to speak, proceeds according to determined sets of laws. Yes.

Q: And we are in that flow.

A: Most certainly we are.

Q: The earnestness with which we might try to settle this issue, our feelings, our thoughts, our striving—that is irrelevant. It’s window dressing. This conversation actually cannot go in different possible directions. It can only go in one direction.

A: That would ultimately have to be so.

Q: Now, are atoms and their components, and any other tiny particles in the universe…are any of them conscious?

A: Of course not. The particles themselves are not conscious.

Q: Some scientists speculate they are.

A: Some people speculate that the moon can be sliced and served on a plate with fruit.

Q: What do you think “conscious” means?

A: It means we participate in life. We take action. We converse. We gain knowledge.

Q: Any of the so-called faculties we possess—are they ultimately anything more than particles in motion?

A: Well, no, they aren’t. Because everything is particles in motion. What else could be happening in this universe? Nothing.

Q: All right. I’d like to consider the word “understanding.”

A: It’s a given. It’s real.

Q: How so?

A: The proof that it’s real, if you will, is that we are having this conversation. It makes sense to us.

Q: Yes, but how can there be understanding if everything is particles in motion? Do the particles possess understanding?

A: No they don’t.

Q: To change the focus just a bit, how can what you and I are saying have any meaning?

A: Words mean things.

Q: Again, I have to point out that, in a universe with no free will, we only have particles in motion. That’s all. That’s all we are. So where does “meaning” come from?

A: “We understand language” is a true proposition.

Q: You’re sure.

A: Of course.

Q: Then I suggest you’ve tangled yourself in a contradiction. In the universe you depict, there would be no room for understanding. Or meaning. There would be nowhere for it to come from. Unless particles understand. Do they?

A: No.

Q: Then where do “understanding” and “meaning” come from?

A: [Silence.]

Q: Furthermore, sir, if we accept your depiction of a universe of particles, then there is no basis for this conversation at all. We don’t understand each other. How could we?

A: But we do understand each other.

Q: And therefore, your philosophic materialism (no free will, only particles in motion) must have a flaw.

A: What flaw?

Q: Our existence contains more than particles in motion.

A: More? What would that be?

Q: Would you grant that whatever it is, it is non-material?

A: It would have to be, but…

Q: Then, driving further along this line, there is something non-material which is present, which allows us to understand each other, which allows us to comprehend meaning. We are conscious. Puppets are not conscious. As we sit here talking, I understand you. Do you understand me?

A: Of course.

Q: Then that understanding is coming from something other than particles in motion. Without this non-material quality, you and I would be gibbering in the dark.

A: You’re saying that, if all the particles in the universe, including those that make up the brain, possess no consciousness, no understanding, no comprehension of meaning, no freedom, then how can they give birth to understanding and freedom. There must be another factor, and it would have to be non-material.

Q: Yes. That’s what I’m saying. And I think you have to admit your view of determinism and particles in motion—that picture of the universe—leads to several absurdities.

A: Well…perhaps I’m forced to consider it. Otherwise, we can’t sit here and understand each other.

Q: You and I do understand each other.

A: I hadn’t thought it through this way before, but if there is nothing inherent in particles that gives rise to understanding and meaning, then everything is gibberish. Except it isn’t gibberish. Yes, I seem to see a contradiction. Interesting.

Q: And if these non-material factors—understanding and meaning—exist, then other non-material factors can exist.

A: For example, freedom. I suppose so.

Q: And the drive to eliminate freedom in the world…is more than just the attempt to substitute one automatic reflex for another.

A: That would be…yes, that would be so.

Q: Scientists would be absolutely furious about the idea that, despite all their maneuvering, the most essential aspects of human life are beyond the scope of what they, the scientists, are “in charge of.”

A: It would be a naked challenge to the power of science.

Einstein puffed on his pipe and looked out over the valley. He took a sip of his beer. After a minute, he said, “Let me see if I can summarize this, because it’s really rather startling. The universe is nothing but particles. All those particles follow laws of motion. They aren’t free. The brain is made up entirely of those same particles. Therefore, there is nothing in the brain that would give us freedom. These particles also don’t understand anything, they don’t make sense of anything, they don’t grasp the meaning of anything. Since the brain, again, is made up of those particles, it has no power to allow us to grasp meaning or understand anything. But we do understand. We do grasp meaning. Therefore, we are talking about qualities we possess which are not made out of energy. These qualities are entirely non-material.”

He nodded.

“In that case,” he said, “there is…oddly enough, a completely different sphere or territory. It’s non-material. Therefore, it can’t be measured. Therefore, it has no beginning or end. If it did, it would be a material continuum and we could measure it.”

He pointed to the valley.

“That has energy. But what does it give me? Does it allow me to be conscious? Does it allow me to be free, to understand meaning? No.”

Then he laughed. He looked at me.

“I’m dead,” he said, “aren’t I? I didn’t realize it until this very moment.”

I shook my head. “No. I would say you WERE dead until this moment.”

He grinned. “Yes!” he said. “That’s a good one. I WAS dead.”

He stood up.

“Enough of this beer,” he said. “I have some schnapps inside. Let me get it. Let’s drink the good stuff! After all, I’m apparently Forever. And so are you. And so are we all.”


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

This is the dream and this is the dreamer for five minutes

This is the dream and this is the dreamer for five minutes

A crazy poem…and explaining the poem…

by Jon Rappoport

February 21, 2017

Whenever I need to remind myself of the essentials, I return to these things:

Poems.

Poems that disassemble reality.

Poems that take apart the machine.

Why not?


I’m walking up Broadway past the print houses and the owl houses and the pool room and the steamships and the tide rushing out leaving an octopus stranded looking around to understand this new planet

I’m walking past a glass and steel triangle and a copper dome and a stand of fruit on the sidewalk and a powder blue Cadillac mumbling old church hymns

I’m walking up Broadway past a row of theaters and an old clock on the side of a tan brick colossus

women in high heels with skinny legs

luminous machine-bankers

Parisian men wearing straw hats rowing small boats in the blue-ink canals

I’m lying back in a leather chair in Grand Central Station and an old man is cutting my hair

he puts a hot white towel on my face

I enter St. Pat’s, it’s a huge bookie joint, crowds standing in the aisles, betting on anti-Lucifer

I take a seat at the end of a long pew and fold my hands in prayer to Piero della Francesca, silver painter of Solomon & Sheba

and Henry Miller of the Rosy Crucifixion and Kenneth Patchen in his bed of pain and Gregory Corso roaming the streets of Rotterdam

blessings of wine and bread and skeletons growing new flesh

…walking up Broadway at dusk, melting into the crowds, reading their money minds, worshiping the sun veined with purple roses, a department store dream, marble floors, silent limousines waiting at the curb

I’m walking past four-armed genetic heralds and sad androids and murderous shoe salesmen from the 1950s, velvet furniture, apples too red to be real, false blood, reporters lapping up fumes, idolatrous cellophane ghosts in the park, moon over old Hoboken, broken planks on the dock

savage lulubells bloom in cartoon park and westerly winds, an ice landing full of chimes and lopsided sunrise, heroic mahogany symphony on walls of scribbled gilded breath, ornate redemption of vehicles

I walk past Hantu Raya balloons and prelude war parade glittering confetti, Bowery brown and gray men scattered out on the dismal sidewalk

piers of giant locks and hasps, through tunnels of rotting rain, into the cobblestone wind

last slanted rays on green vines, stolen by the Church from nature, stolen by nature from an unknown poet

the escape into furniture, the soul over and over again

The heralds sang, the disputed heaven tottered and broke through the clouds

Why not?

What is the addiction to reality?

To the machine?

Loosen the cords.

Take a ride on the elevated trolley…

“But I don’t understand that ‘poem’ you wrote…I don’t understand a thing in it…”

“That’s all right…did anything kick off a spark, just one…”

“Well maybe could be…the powder blue Cadillac and the stolen by nature from an unknown poet…”

“Have you ever had a dream where you walked through a landscape that was more real than waking life…”

“Sure, everybody has. I was in a mall that reminded me of some kind of moonscape. It was super-real, and when I woke up I felt…refreshed…like I’d taken a bath in energy…”

“Well, that’s how I felt when I wrote that crazy poem…”

“Really?”

“Really.”

“Why?”

“Why not?”

“But I mean, it doesn’t make any sense…”

“Can’t you take a quick vacation from making ordinary sense?”

“Is that allowed?”

“Who is supposed to allow it?”

“Don’t know…”

“Is there a king who decides what makes sense?”

“Everybody decides all together…”

“You mean they meet in a room and have a conference?”

“Well no…”

“I think secretly you understood the poem…”

“No, no, no…”

“Why not?”

“I’m not supposed to.”

“Who said so?”

“If I understood it, I’d be crazy…”

“You weren’t crazy in that moonscape dream.”

“But that was just a dream.”

“The poem is a kind of dream. You can think of it that way.”

“I can?”

“Absolutely. I give you permission.”

“Who are you?”

“I’m a dispenser of wide-ranging allowances. I’m a vacation expert. I give you a poem that’s a five-minute vacation from the machine…”

“Why?”

“Just for the hell of it.”

“Just like that?”

“Just like that.”

“Who gave you that job?”

“The Pope.”

“Who?”

“I met with the Pope and he said it was okay.”

“You’re messing with me.”

“Okay, it wasn’t the Pope. It was me. I gave myself permission.”

“Just a five-minute vacation?”

“That’s all. And then you can go back to what you were doing.”

“I lay down a book called reality and I pick up another book for five minutes.”

“That’s right.”

“Maybe I could do that.”

“I believe you could.”

“I could sort of act like I was crazy for five minutes.”

“If you want to think of it that way.”

“I could just climb out on a limb and jump off…”

“Sure. If you want to think of it that way.”

“I could pretend I was walking around on the moon for five minutes.”

“Why not?”

“I could pretend I understood the poem.”

“Yes, pretend you did. Pretend you do.”

“Fake it.”

“Exactly. Fake it.”

“Well, why didn’t you say that? I know how to fake it.”

“I’m sure you do.”

“I fake it most of the time. I mean, I sort of fake things so I can understand them. First, I fake it. Then I get into what I’m faking. It’s like acting. It’s like being in a play.”

“Of course. You’re in a play and you’re playing a character who understands the poem. Why not?”

“And then I leave the play and I go back to being me.”

“Sure. It’s up to you.”

“I can invent whatever I want to for five minutes.”

“Nobody would stop you.”

“Well, I can think of a few people who would stop me.”

“Which people?”

“The Washington Post and a psychiatrist.”

“You mean the Washington Post would run a page-one headline with your name in it and it would say: THIS MAN IS CRAZY.”

“It could happen.”

“Really.”

“Yes.”

“You think the Washington Post cares.”

“It’s possible.”

“I’ll bet you a thousand dollars they don’t run the headline.”

“You think I’m nuts? I wouldn’t take that bet.”

“The Washington Post won’t know you understand the poem. Trust me.”

“You’re sure.”

“Positively.”

“Okay. I understand the poem.”

“See? That was easy.”

“I mean I can pretend I understand it.”

“Good. It’s just a five-minute vacation.”

“I can do that.”

“I know you can.”

“I throw the rules out the window.”

“Right.”

“It’s a relief.”

“I know.”

“Why are the reality rules there in the first place?”

“It’s foolish, isn’t it?”

“Suppose I invent a new reality for myself?”

“I wouldn’t stop you.”

“Who would?”

“Nobody…”

“Why are you having this conversation with me?”

“You’re having this conversation with yourself. I’m just egging you on a little…”

“You’re stimulating me.”

“If you want to think of it that way.”

“It’s an interesting poem.”

“I like it.”

“Why?”

“I just do.”

“You promise you won’t tell anybody that I stopped being ordinary me for five minutes?”

“I promise.”

“Because my whole reputation could be ruined.”

“I promise.”

“People would say I went off the rails.”

“No one will know.”

“This conversation never happened.”

“Never.”

“I’m sane. Always was, always will be.”

“You bet.”

“I’m an ordinary person trying to understand something that isn’t ordinary for five minutes. That’s as far as I’m willing to go.”

“Understood.”

“Reality is ordinary all the way down. It couldn’t be otherwise.”

“Absolutely.”

“Okay. Now get out of here. I don’t want anybody watching me while I fake it and pretend something makes sense that makes no sense.”

“I’m gone.”

“Bye.”

“Bye.”


power outside the matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

The myth of collective consciousness

The myth of collective consciousness

by Jon Rappoport

February 20, 2017

“There are millions of people who came out of the 1960s with the idea that ‘self’ was a terrible entity, and only by existing all together, with everyone, in a single state of consciousness, could the world be saved. They bought a new fairy tale to replace an old one. They couldn’t find another answer to materialism.” (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

In past articles, I’ve extensively covered the collective/group myth on several levels. But what about the so-called spiritual level?

What about the influential idea that, in an advanced state, humans would enter an ultimate collective cosmic unity?

Let’s start this way: somehow, you’re given access to the greatest store anywhere in the universe. Your credit card has no limit.

You walk through the gigantic space. You see cars and clothes and shoes and food and cell phones and toys and books and DVDs and CDs and TV sets and private jets and ships and pictures of mansions and islands for sale and pets and more, much more.

You love it.

You spend a long, long time browsing and buying and chatting with the friendly staff, and you know that, yes, this is the store you’ve always to shop in. This is the place.

And finally, when you’ve made all your purchases, and you’re on your way out, you discover that all the doors are locked. You can’t leave.

At that moment, the store isn’t your favorite place anymore.

Something is wrong. Very wrong.

So here’s the comparison; yes, any state of consciousness that can be conceived or imagined or proposed is possible, but adding the kicker that it’s final and nobody exits from it is preposterous.

Individuals can have the experience of merging with each other—that collective experience. The “I” can decide to become “We.” Sure. Why not?

But…

Having done that, you can decide at some point that it’s time to leave. Then, if you couldn’t leave, you’d change your mind about the whole set-up.

Some people would say that once you entered collective cosmic consciousness, you’d never want to leave, but that’s just their opinion.

In other words, every possible state of consciousness is voluntary, effected in freedom. Ditto for exiting it.

Which means there is nothing final about collective consciousness or unity. It isn’t the final attainment. It’s another form of perception.

You can choose a role in the play of consciousness, and you can also retire from the cast and go on to other roles. And wherever you go, whatever you do, you’re you.

Being you isn’t limiting in the slightest, unless you make it so.

If you have been severely hamstringing you, the automatic solution isn’t suddenly “merging with everyone and everything else.” That might be a good and interesting exercise, to pull you out of a doldrum and a state of inertia, but it isn’t The Answer. There are lots of ways you can launch out of inertia.

Someone says, “Let’s all be One.”

You say, “Sounds exciting. I’m in.”

And then you do it.

“Wow,” you say, “this is fantastic. I’m you and you’re me and we’re all together—here comes a bunch more people to join in.”

You stay there in Oneness for a while. You have a great time…and then you say, “See you later, guys, it’s been fun.”

And they say, “Wait, how can you leave? This is IT.”

And you say, “I know. But there are lots of ITS. Bye bye.”

Entrances and exits, entrances and exits.


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

The point at which all news becomes fake news

The point at which all news becomes fake news

by Jon Rappoport

February 15, 2017

This is a companion piece to my previous article, “Occult Man and his search for his true Nature.”

True and vital news about the world as it actually is behind the scenes, will always be true, unless a person uses it to stop his forward progress and stop his graduation up on to another level of consciousness. In that case, true news becomes fake, because the person is absorbing it to keep himself from discovering his basic nature.

The most familiar way this happens: “The world is completely controlled by elite forces. I’ve figured it out. There is nothing I can do about it. I’ll just keep my head down and live out my life…”

Passivity.

Investigation leads to insight leads to passivity.

Or: “I see what’s really happening in the world. Finally. But I can’t talk to the people I know about it. They don’t get it. So I’ll forget the whole thing and just try to get along…”

Investigation leads to insight leads to passivity.

Suppose, though, a person’s true nature is: THE MAKER OF REALITIES.

In that case, his investigation has uncovered the fact that elites are making their realities for all of us…and the individual’s true nature involves flipping the script.

Discovering how elites contrive reality should be a bracing insight. It should inspire new energy. It should give birth to a counter instinct. The creative instinct.

The individual’s “phase-two” journey begins from recognizing his own creative force.

Think of it as: the painter who has never painted wakes up one morning and sees, all around him, a studio: blank canvases, brushes, paints. Now he can start.

The world is open. The future is open.

Now, the real news is still real. It isn’t his reason to become passive. Quite the opposite.


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.